Crystal Andrus Morissette: The Emotional Edge

by Rachel Baker on February 8, 2016

I got about halfway through The Emotional Edge and decided beyond a shadow of a doubt, I’d already four others like it; and its most reminiscent of Jean Shinoda Bolen’s Archetype books. I’m not well-versed enough to discuss the differences in these books in regards to Jungian theory, but it seems like each could have been the other with a teeny-weeny difference in what we call our ego, id and superego.

That said, everyone learns and absorbs differently. For some, Morissette’s The Emotional Edge may be a better tool to help live life to the fullest. The author does a good job explaining, and giving examples of, the Parental, Child and Adult archetypes, as well as the sub-archetypes under each. For the most part, this book seems like a supplement to course work – walking the reader through figuring out what archetype(s) s/he may fall under, how to communicate through (or around) that archetype and how to transcend said archetype. Having checked out the author’s SWAT Institute, it does seem aspects of the book are being used in some of the training courses.

I wish I could say I liked this book and recommend it to everyone, but I can’t and I don’t. I think this is one of those books you should really leaf through at the bookstore before you buy it. As with many self-help books, this one will only speak to certain people; and you may not be one of them. Had I not been sent this book for an honest review, I would never have picked it up. There is nothing new here, other than maybe the idea of an emotional age, that a good therapist couldn’t help you learn to do in a bit more personalized way that might actually help. I’m not sure I think the idea of an emotional age is a new concept and if it really helps knowing, but that would be the new in a whole lot of old.

One final note regarding the book jacket. Often times, red is an angry color. I don’t think I understand using a red to yellow umbra fading. I thought for book that was supposed to be uplifting, this was a terrible choice from a marketing perspective.

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