Bookcrossing.com

by OMB Staff on December 21, 2007

bookcrossing

A few months ago, we ran across a site called Bookcrossing. On April 17, 2001, BookCrossing.com was launched with a simple $500 press release, the last time money has been spent promoting the site.

We love successful sites like this! There’s a whole lot of passion involved when a site doesn’t need to spend money to promote itself.

NYTimes article about bookcrossing linked at the bottom of the article.

This site is so cool! Here’s how you participate:

“Grab a book, any book.

Register it with www.bookcrossing.com and jot its unique BookCrossing ID (BCID) down in the book, along with the website url Get nifty labels here or here. If it’s already a BookCrossing book, you can skip this step.)

Read your book and then use the BCID to make a journal entry on it. You?ll find a place to do that here on the home page or through the link on the left side bar

Release the book out into the wild and wait for it to write home to you. (You can also give the book to a friend, send it on a book ring etc– just be sure to make a release note on it when you send it off into the world.)” ~http://www.bookcrossing.com/home

You can “hunt” for books released in your area, you can record where you dropped off your book, or record where you found a book. There are 620,036 members and 4,428,832 books registered. Amazing!

Anyway, go check it out… hunt for a book, release a book, just enjoy reading the journal travels of some of the books!

For more information, you can read the NY Times Article on Bookcrossing

After all, the idea behind BookCrossing.com is simple. You drop off a book in a public place. Or pick up one someone else left behind. Eventually the whole world becomes one big, free library. More than 600,000 people engage in “catch and release” missions worldwide. I wanted to be one.

BookCrossing.com seemed like poetic justice. The Internet, which threatens to replace good, old-fashioned books with soulless bits of downloadable information that readers have to click through, instead was extending the lives of my paper friends.

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